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Mogadishu Appeals Court upholds death sentence for Sayid Ali convicted of killing wife

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Sayid was convicted of burning his pregnant wife, Luul Abdiaziz, to death.

The Appeals Court in Mogadishu has upheld the death sentence of Sayid Ali Moalim Daud.

Sayid was convicted of burning his pregnant wife, Luul Abdiaziz, to death. The court's decision follows weeks of hearings and supports the original verdict issued by the Banadir Regional Court in March 2024.



Presiding judge Saiid Ali announced that the court was convinced by the evidence presented, confirming Sayid's guilt.

"After listening to the case, this court upholds the judgement delivered by the regional court," read part of the judgement.

Sayid's lawyer, Ali Halane, expressed his dissatisfaction with the verdict and announced plans to appeal to the highest court in the country.

Another appeal

"I am not satisfied with the death sentence verdict issued by the court of appeal. I will move to the highest court," Halane noted.

Sayid Ali Moalim Daud. He was convicted of burning his pregnant wife, Luul Abdiaziz, to death. (Photo: Handout)


The Banadir Regional Court's Chairman, Salah Ali Mahamoud, on March this year handed the death sentence to Sayid.

Salah cited the evidence gathered in the case, which proved that Sayid had intentionally burned his wife.

Luul Abdiaziz, a 28-year-old airport worker, died in January after being set on fire by her 24-year-old husband at their home in the Dharkenley district.

The mother of six, who was pregnant at the time, succumbed to her injuries at Digfer Hospital in Mogadishu.

Her death sparked widespread outrage across Somalia, and demonstrations calling for justice were held several times in Mogadishu.

Following the incident, Sayid went into hiding. Authorities apprehended him a week later, providing a sense of closure to Luul's grieving family.

"Justice has been done. I'm so grateful," Luul's father said.

The court's decision to uphold the death sentence has already received appreciation from hundreds of anti-gender-based violence groups that believe justice has played its course.

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